simple pumpkin seed recipe

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there are different kinds of pumpkins?? yaaaaaaas.

if you're like me i get real excited around fall time.  i wait anxiously for a cool morning so i can wear my husker sweatshirt (and sometimes have to change my clothes because nebraska is still too warm for it weather-wise).  i also get excited when i see pumpkins at the grocery store.  however, i have never given much attention to the decorative looking pumpkins because i'm usually too cheap to buy the obligatory decorative pumpkin.  BUT i found out that you can indeed eat some of the pumpkins that look decorative!!  WIN and WIN.  They were also only $2.97.  So you get lots of vegetable and a bunch of seeds for $3?  I'm in.  I ended up buying a musque de provence (i learned this from googling it after my store purchase) and it tasted amazing.  you can use any of these pumpkins to make seeds!

say what?  here are the many varieties of pumpkins.

the greatest part about all these pumpkins is that you can follow this general method of cooking for all of them which i will explain below.

first take out the core.

first you want to take out the core using a paring knife (very carefully).  

cut the pumpkin in half and scoop out the seeds.

then cut the pumpkin in half and scoop out the seeds and goop.  Then cut the pumpkin in quarters if it is reasonably large.  If your knife is kinda crappy you can cut it part of the way through and then break the pumpkin the rest of the way with your hands (not ideal, but it will do).  plop the seeds into a bowl of cold water.  the goop will sink and the seeds will float.  

dry the seeds and bake 'em.

the seeds into a colander and dry them with a paper towel the best you can (it does not have to be perfect).  or leave them in the colander and let them dry out for a couple hours if you are not short on time.  

toss 'em in olive oil and salt.

 then toss them in enough olive oil to coat them lightly and place them on a sheet tray in a single layer.  then all you have to do is roast them in the oven until they are golden brown and popping off the tray.  

yes, pumpkin seeds pop like popcorn when they're done roasting.

season away!

after they're done roasting you can season them with any seasonings you'd like.  how about cinnamon sugar??  thyme, cayenne, black pepper??

what do you do with the rest of the pumpkin?

roast it and have loads of delicious pumpkin for days!!  once you cut the pumpkin in half or quarters, place it in the oven at 375 F on a baking sheet with a little water covering the bottom of the pan with cut sides of the pumpkin down.  roast for about 15 mins until the skin looks soft, then remove from the oven and peel the skin with a paring knife once it has cooled down some.  then dice it and continue roasting.  you can continue roasting it this way for 15 mins, then check it every 5-10 mins until it's soft when poked with a fork.  roast at a higher temp like 400 F if you want them to get a little caramelized.  and that's it!  then you have pumpkin ready to feed babies with or make soup or make pie or make a salad!

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basic pumpkin seeds

First take:

1 pumpkin cleaned and seeds removed

Remove seeds from the pumpkin.  place seeds and goop into a bowl and add water.  the goop will sink and the seeds will float.  remove seeds to a colander and pat dry the best you can.  it doesn't have to be perfect!  or let them dry in the colander for several hours if you are not short on time.

Then toss seeds in some:

olive oil (enough to lightly coat the seeds)

kosher salt (a few pinches)

Then roast seeds at 325 F on a sheet try until they pop and are turning a nice golden brown.  Depending on the type of pumpkin seeds you're using this could take anywhere from 15-30 mins.  Mine took closer to 30 mins, just check them every 5 mins or so and give them a stir.  Once seeds are roasted you can add any seasonings and spices that you like:

black pepper (optional)

cayenne (optional)

fresh thyme (optional)

That's it!

 

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